LSPA's Cyano Count Program

  Gloeotrichia echinulata  is likely the most prevalent cyanobacteria living in Lake Sunapee today.

Gloeotrichia echinulata is likely the most prevalent cyanobacteria living in Lake Sunapee today.

The Cyano Count Program encourages lake users to look for cyanobacteria (formerly known as blue/green algae) and record their observations throughout the summer season.

Created in 2014, the Cyano Count Program helps LSPA and the NH Department of Environmental Services (NHDES) locate cyano blooms. A cyano bloom looks like an unappealing blue/green scum layer on the water (see photo, right).

Cyanobacteria, under the right conditions, can bloom or flourish in very large numbers creating a situation that can present health issues to you or your pet.

Cyano reports assist LSPA and NHDES in locating and possibly warning the public of a potential health hazard.

For the first half of geological time our ancestors were bacteria. Most creatures still are bacteria, and each one of our trillion cells is a colony of bacteria.
— Richard Dawkins